Analyze MongoLab Data with Hadoop in Mortar

The following is a guest post by Doug Daniels, CTO of Mortar Data Inc.

Today, we’re excited to announce integration between MongoLab and Mortar, the Hadoop platform for high-scale data science. If you have one of the 100,000+ databases at MongoLab, you can now seamlessly use Hadoop to:

  • Run advanced algorithms (like recommendation engines)
  • Build reports that run quickly in parallel against large collections
  • Join multiple collections (and outside data) together for analysis
  • Store results to Google Drive, back to MongoLab, or many other destinations

In this article we’ll show you how to connect your MongoLab database to Hadoop, and then use Hadoop to do something simple but very useful: gather schema information from an entire collection, including histograms of common values, data types, and more. Mortar handles all deployment, monitoring and cluster management, so no prior knowledge of Hadoop is required. Continue Reading →

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Announcing New MongoDB Instances on Microsoft Azure

The following is a guest blog post by Brian Benz, Senior Technical Evangelist at Microsoft Open Technologies, Inc.

Since the previous release of production-ready MongoLab plans on Azure, we’ve seen demand increase significantly. The MongoLab and Microsoft teams have been working together to develop a solution for your growing requirements and are excited to announce the arrival of our newest high-memory MongoDB database plans, with virtual machine choices that now provide up to 56GB of RAM per node with availability in all eight Azure datacenters worldwide. Continue Reading →

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Heartbleed security update

As many of you know, a serious vulnerability in the OpenSSL cryptographic software library was recently discovered: CVE-2014-0160. This vulnerability is commonly called the “Heartbleed Bug” and is described at http://heartbleed.com.

The Heartbleed vulnerability can be exploited by an attacker to gain access to the cryptographic keys used to secure communication between clients and servers using SSL, which includes most communication with web servers using HTTPS. Furthermore, this vulnerability can be used to access the system memory of running servers. As a result, an attacker can potentially listen to client-server traffic, steal passwords, and even hijack an HTTP session. Continue Reading →

MongoDB driver tips & tricks: Node.js Mongoose ODM

Updated 9/21/15: This blog post is now outdated. We recommend upgrading your driver to the latest version of Mongoose. If you have any questions or difficulties, email us at support@mongolab.com.

Many of the support requests we get at MongoLab are questions about how to properly configure and use particular MongoDB drivers and client libraries.

This blog post is the 2nd of a series where we are covering the popular MongoDB drivers in depth (we covered Mongoid last time). The driver we’re covering today is Mongoose, which is maintained by Aaron Heckmann (@aaronheckmann) and officially supported by MongoDB, Inc. Continue Reading →

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MongoLab now manages over 100,000 databases! (102,280 to be exact)

We’re proud to announce that MongoLab is now powering over 100,000 cloud MongoDB databases in 23 datacenters worldwide! Continue Reading →

Finding duplicate keys with MongoDB’s aggregation framework

Quite frequently our users want to create a unique index on a data set but encounter some form of the following error because of duplicate key value(s):

E11000 duplicate key error index: db.collection.$field_1_field2_1  dup key: { : 1.0 : 1.0 }

While MongoDB supports an option to drop duplicates, dropDups, during index builds, this option forces the creation of a unique index by way of deleting data. If you use the dropDups option, MongoDB will create an index on the first occurrence of a value for a given key and then  delete all subsequent values. While this behavior may be acceptable in some cases, it’s important to be cautious whenever you are deleting data. Continue Reading →

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MongoDB driver tips & tricks: Mongoid 3

Update 9/21/2015: Mongoid 5, which runs on top of the MongoDB Ruby driver, has been released. We highly recommend upgrading to the latest driver – this article is now outdated. Please reach out to support@mongolab.com if you have any questions.

Update 8/18/2014: Added section about refresh_interval, removed Mongoid 4 references

Many of the support requests we get at MongoLab are questions about how to properly configure and use particular MongoDB drivers.

This blog post is the first of a series where we plan to cover each of the major MongoDB drivers in depth. The driver we’ll be covering today is Mongoid, developed by Durran Jordan (@modetojoy). Continue Reading →

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Future of MongoDB: Fireside chat with MongoDB CTO Eliot Horowitz

Last night I attended a Meetup at MongoDB Inc.’s new Palo Alto office to hear MongoDB’s CTO, Eliot Horowitz, speak about the product roadmap. With a new production release right around the corner and MongoDB World in the not-so-distant future, the buzz and excitement around all things MongoDB is high. For those who were not able to attend, we’re going to recap all the major points Eliot made.

Continue Reading →

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